The Lady Garden

Tea and Strumpets

On housework, and paying other people to do it for me

Cross posted

In a column on what New Zealand’s public priorities ought to be, economist Brian Easton give a brief summary of the latent functions of work, as articulated by social psychologist Marie Jahoda.

That is because work is a socially valuable experience. It does not just pay us, but it has some latent social functions:

- Employment imposes a time structure on the working day:

- It involves regularly shared experiences and contacts with people outside the nuclear family:

- It links an individual to goals and purposes which transcend her or his own:

- It enforces activity.

….A quick summary is that we because we are social animals we are happy to work, for it gives us more than just income.

That all seems plausible to me, and it certainly explains at least some of the disconnection I experienced when we lived in Adelaide, where my work was irregular and not integrated into a particular workplace community. Easton uses the analysis to show why we need to do better with respect to managing unemployment, and why we need to change our attitudes towards the unemployed. If you are at all interested in New Zealand’s economic priorities, or in social justice, then Easton’s column is very much worth reading.

It’s the next thing that Easton says in his column that has had me thinking.

You will observe that housework is not quite as successful at covering the latent functions – as well as it is not paid – which may explain why it is unpopular.

Why, YES!

- Housework has no time structure, for it is always there, always waiting to be done, always able to be done. One cannot resolve to finish housework for the day, turn off the computer, leave the office and go home to relax, because home is the very site where housework occurs.
- Housework occurs within the nuclear family.
- Perhaps housework does link one to goals and purposes outside one’s own goals and purposes, in the sense that it helps to create an environment in which other people can thrive, but that seems to stretch the idea of transcendence a little far.
- But it does enforce activity. It’s just hard for me to see it as particularly enjoyable activity, ‘though I know that others differ in this regard.

I find it very, very hard to motivate myself to do housework, ‘though oddly enough, i find it easier to do so when I have to fit it in around my paid work. A quick 15 minutes here or there is not too difficult to manage. But 15 minutes here or there isn’t really enough to keep it all under control, especially when we are both in paid employment. So… we have outsourced the horrid work, and hired a cleaner.

And there’s the rub. I know that all of us have work preferences, that just as the thought of academic work might send you running for the hills, the thought of say, accounts work makes we want to crawl under my desk in despair. But it seems that most people loathe housework, and really, I don’t see why my cleaner would enjoy it any more than I do. Of course, he can lock the door and go home… to more housework. And he gets paid for the work, which must help. However he works on his own – no social structure around work for him. Just in and out of different houses, cleaning, with no one to share the work, no one to chat to, to sit down for a coffee break with.

I tend to try to be out of the house when our cleaner comes in, partly so that he doesn’t have to work around me, partly because even though academic work is flexible, I prefer to work in my office on campus, and partly because our current cleaner insists on chatting to me, so that I can’t get on with my own work, and partly because I always find it hard having tradies in my space (that would be my native curmudgeonliness and introversion coming out ). But I’ve just started to think that making an effort to be absent is unfair, and that if I am going to provide a decent work environment, then as well as making sure that he is fairly paid (we hire and pay for cleaners through a local company, which means that we can be sure that the workers are getting the going rate, and holiday pay and sick pay and so on), I ought to be open to making sure that some of those latent functions of work are served as well. I don’t think I need to make a special effort to stay home, but scuttling out as quickly as I can seems to be at least a little churlish.

Or maybe this is all just too middle-class-angst-ridden for words, and I should just get over it.

*****************************

Previous writing on housework (as you can see this has been a bit of a touchstone issue for me over the years):
- Ouch!
- Dinosaurs thundering by again
- Simone de Beauvoir on housework
- We need a wife
- Sharing the load

One response to “On housework, and paying other people to do it for me

  1. Moz June 6, 2012 at 3:18 pm

    These days even cleaning as part of a team seems to be pretty solitary, based on seeing the cleaners come through my workplace. But I have to say that cleaning can have its rewards – you get to leave the place cleaner than when you arrived. That reward is often missing from housework, both because you’re not making much visible difference and because within twenty seconds something will mess it up again. Washing just off the line doesn’t look any different to the stuff in the laundry basket, but it has had more housework done to it.

    I do like the external nature of work. When I’ve been doing full time activism I’ve actively looked for opportunities to get involved with outside campaigns because what I do has tended to be solitary and have very long fulfillment times. So going along to a random protest or volunteering with Greenpeace or The Greens is a great way to do something involving other people that pays off immediately (as far as I’m concerned: protest attended, tick; climbing gear sorted, cleaned and checked: tick).

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